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Faculty Resources

Faculty Qualifications

Following are the operational definitions of faculty qualifications and engagement.

I. Rationale

AACSB accreditation standards clearly articulate the need for schools to demonstrate that faculty members are current in their field of teaching.  Standard #15, which addresses faculty qualifications, states that appropriate criteria must be in place to guide faculty regarding (1) initial academic and professional preparation/engagement and (2) sustained academic and professional engagement activities to maintain/enhance currency and relevancy for teaching. The standard further requires that engagement activities be consistent with mission, expected outcomes, and strategies.

The IU Kokomo School of Business Mission states that, “The School of Business provides innovative, quality, and cost-effective undergraduate and graduate business education in North Central Indiana. The School prepares students with the skills to excel and function responsibly in a diverse global economy. The faculty is dedicated to making a positive impact through excellence in teaching, research, service, and community engagement.” The IU Kokomo Promotion and Tenure Criteria further states, “In evaluating scholarship, many kinds of activities and products should be given credit. Suitable measures of excellence should be developed, and credit should be given for non-traditional as well as traditional forms of scholarship.”

Faculty members may produce contributions through both traditional academic research, and through professional engagement activities that include applied and practical contributions. Measuring the impact of these activities is challenging. One principle that could be applied to intellectual contributions is the perceived quality of the faculty member’s activity or accomplishment. In the case of writing, the quality of the manuscript could be assessed by the rigor and structure of the review process that leads to publication, and the number of citations. Measuring the impact of other activities is more difficult; however, there are indicators of recognition that provide validation and recognition of the work of faculty members. External validation may include recognition through selection to serve on an editorial committee or board. Other validation factors may include invited presentations, research awards, fellow status, and officer positions in academic societies. From this perspective, we can introduce the notion of third party validation as a means of assessing the current knowledge, skills, and/or abilities of a faculty member.

The extent to which the business community or others in the academy seek the faculty member’s expertise is a reasonable surrogate for evidence of the faculty member’s currency.  Thus, a guiding principle should be the value – both intrinsic and extrinsic – that external stakeholders place on a faculty member’s talent. Providing evidence of the impact of intellectual and professional contributions then becomes a function of the quality of the contribution or third party validation, and ultimately on the effect of the research on theory, practice, and/or teaching/pedagogy in business and management.  These two guiding principles lead to the following definitions and lists of activities that faculty should pursue to remain qualified. 

II. Initial Academic and Professional Preparation

The following criteria define a faculty member as either an Academic or as a Practitioner based upon their original academic and professional preparation.

A faculty member with a terminal degree (doctorate) from an AACSB accredited institution (or equivalent) in their academic discipline (or closely related discipline) will be considered an Academic.

A faculty member with a master’s degree from an accredited institution and with significant professional work experience in the discipline at the time of hire will be considered a Practitioner. The professional experience must be significant in duration (at least five years), significant in responsibility, and relatively current at the hiring date. The amount of professional experience expected may be greater if teaching assignments are expected to be at the graduate level.

The following two sections describe how both Academics and Practitioners may maintain currency either through research and scholarly activities (section III) or through professional engagement activities (section IV).

III. Faculty who Maintain Currency through Research and Scholarly Activities

Academic scholarship typically results in intellectual contributions, such as peer-reviewed journal articles or the equivalent. To ensure quality expectations, the journal must meet at least one of the guidelines in the School of Business “Quality in Publishing Outlets” document. Intellectual contributions may have impact on theory, practice, and/or teaching and pedagogy. However, many other scholarly activities can be considered to maintain/enhance currency and relevancy for teaching and are listed below.

Classification I

  1. Publication of a refereed journal article that meets our “Quality in Publishing Outlets” statement.
  2. Publication of a case in an outlet that meets our “Quality in Publishing Outlets” statement.
  3. Publication of a book or book chapter by an academic press.

Classification II

  1. Peer-reviewed proceedings from scholarly meetings.
  2. Funding from a grant proposal.
  3. Validation through receipt of a peer-reviewed teaching award, research award, or fellow status.
  4. Invited presentations.
  5. Presentation at an academic conference (not counted in a proceedings).
  6. Published materials, such as workbooks or manuals that enhance teaching in one’s field.

Classification III

  1. Serving on an editorial board.
  2. Serving as a reviewer.
  3. Leadership position in an academic society.
  4. Maintaining a professional certification or license through continuing education.

Each item in Classification III can be counted as a maximum of one scholarly activity per year. Note that to maintain currency through research and scholarly activities, a minimum number of Classification I activities are required, and validation activities from Class II and III cannot substitute for Class I. 

Definitions of Scholarly Categories:

III. A)  Scholarly Academic: A faculty member in the School of Business will be considered qualified as a Scholarly Academic (SA) provided s/he meets the following conditions:

  1. Possesses a doctoral degree in (or related to) the field in which s/he is teaching; and
  2. Has completed over the past five years at least four scholarly activities, of which a minimum of two must be from Classification I of research and scholarly activities.

Exceptions:

  • (i) Faculty members who have received a doctorate degree in the discipline in which they teach within the last 5 years will be considered SA.
  • (ii) Faculty members who are ABD will be considered SA if they are completing their doctorate within the first two years of service in the School of Business.
  • (iii) New faculty members who are transitioning from practice with a doctorate in their academic discipline will also be considered SA within the first five years.

III. B)  Scholarly Practitioner: A faculty member in the School of Business will be considered qualified as a Scholarly Practitioner (SP) provided s/he meets the following conditions: 

  1. Possesses a masters degree or higher in (or related to) the discipline in which they teach and relevant professional experience that is significant in duration and level of responsibility; and
  2. Has completed over the past five years at least four scholarly activities, of which a minimum of one must be from Classification I of research and scholarly activities.

This category is expected to be relatively rare and typically a result of an evolutionary process.

Scholarly standard for graduate teaching: The School places a higher standard for scholarship upon faculty members engaged in graduate teaching.  If currency is maintained through research and scholarly activities, the standard is five scholarly activities within five years, with a minimum of two from Classification I (and a minimum of one in a content area, either basic or applied research).

IV. Faculty who Maintain Currency through Professional Engagement Activities

A faculty member may maintain and enhance their currency and relevancy in teaching by a number of professional engagement activities that involve applications and contributions to practice in their discipline. Although the following activities apply mostly to Practitioners, under special circumstances, an Academic could evolve towards becoming a Practice Academic.

Classification I

  1. Operating or owning a business.
  2. Conducting an active and ongoing consulting practice.
  3. Material and sustained professional full-time work.

Classification II

  1. Technical reports and practice-oriented publications.
  2. Presentations at professional meetings or academic conferences.
  3. Validation through receipt of a peer-reviewed teaching award or professional award.

Classification III

  1. Maintaining a professional certification or license through continuing education.
  2. Creating and delivering professional education programs.
  3. Serving as a member of a board of directors for an organization.
  4. Leadership role in professional associations and societies.
  5. Participation in at least three professional workshops or conferences within one year.

Each item in Classification III can count as a maximum of one professional engagement activity per year.

Definitions of Professional Practice Categories:

IV. A)   Instructional Practitioner: A faculty member in the School of Business will be considered qualified as an Instructional Practitioner (IP) provided s/he meets the following conditions:

  1. Possesses a masters degree or higher in  (or related to) the discipline in which they teach and relevant professional experience that is significant in duration and level of responsibility; and
  2. Is currently working satisfying one of the professional engagement conditions in Classification I; OR
  3. Has completed four professional engagement activities from Classification II or III over the past five years.

Exceptions:

  • (i) An individual who has retired from a senior-level management position within the last 5 years will be considered qualified as an IP for teaching a course directly related to their experience (including occasional graduate level courses).
  • (ii) New faculty members who meet the initial professional preparation in section II at the time of their hire will be considered IP within the first five years.

IV. B)  Practice Academic: A faculty member in the School of Business will be considered qualified as a Practice Academic (PA) provided s/he meets the following conditions:

  1. Possesses a doctoral degree in (or related to) the field in which s/he is teaching; and
  2. Is currently working satisfying one of the professional engagement conditions in Classification I; OR
  3. Has completed three professional engagement activities from Classification II or III and one activity from Classification I of research and scholarly activities over the past five years.

The Practice Academic is expected to be an unusual status, resulting from the rare evolution from Scholarly Academic.

Professional engagement standard for graduate teaching: The School places a higher standard for graduate teaching. If professional engagement activities are used to maintain currency, then the faculty member must satisfy a requirement in Classification I to be qualified to teach graduate courses.

Last updated: 11/11/2016